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Senate Introduces the Internet of Things (IoT) Cybersecurity Improvement Act of 2017 for Government-Acquired IoT Devices

On August 1, 2017, the Senate introduced the “Internet of Things (IoT) Cybersecurity Improvement Act of 2017”, which aims to bolster the security of government-acquired IoT devices.  Sponsored by Sens. Mark Warner (D-VA), Cory Gardner (R-CO), Ron Wyden (D-OR), and Steve Daines (R-MT), the bill would require connected devices purchased by the government agencies to be patchable, rely on industry standard protocols, not use hard-coded passwords, and not contain any known security vulnerabilities.

The bill would also require each executive level agency head to inventory all connected devices used by the agency.  OMB and DHS would establish guidelines for the agencies based on DHS’s Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation (CDM) program.  Specifically, the bill directs OMB to develop alternative network-level security requirements for devise within limited data process and software functionality.  It also directs DHS to issue guidelines regarding cybersecurity coordinated vulnerability disclosure policies to be required by contractors providing connected devices to the U.S. Government.  Finally, researchers would be exempted from liability under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act when engaging in good-faith research pursuant to adopted coordinated vulnerability disclosure guidelines.

This legislation follows calls for more security and standards addressing IoT devices to further safeguard information from potential attacks. For example, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) recently recommended that the Department of Defense update its policies to address IoT risks that leave them vulnerable to attacks.  In addition, Trump’s executive order on cybersecurity called for reports with recommendations to reduce the threat of botnets and other automated distributed attacks.

In a press release, Senator Warner, co-chair of the Senate Cybersecurity Caucus (SCC), states that the bill would provide “thorough, yet flexible guidelines for Federal Government procurements of connected devices.”  In the same statement, the SCC’s co-chair, Sen. Garner, states the bill would “ensure the federal government leads by example and purchases devices that meet basic requirements to prevent hackers from penetrating our government systems.”

To view the introduced legislation, click here.

To view the public statement, click here.

To view the fact sheet summary, click here.